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MeadowMat Widflower Turf Blog

Have a browse of our posts to see what we've been up to in the world of turf!

  1. Wednesday, 5 April 2017 15:10:18 Europe/London

    A recent study has shown that bumblebees are more likely to thrive when their nests are 250 - 1000 metres away from an all-summer long source of good quality pollen and nectar.  Read more in this blogpost.

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    • Posted By: Angela Lambert
  2. Friday, 13 November 2015 08:57:30 Europe/London

    Bee populations are in decline.  Here are five wildflowers that you can nurture to make sure your local bees are well fed all year round.

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    • Posted By: Angela Lambert
  3. Friday, 11 September 2015 10:17:20 Europe/London

    Beehive in a domestic garden with wildflower meadow

     

     

     

     

    Meadowmat's Angela Lambert keeps honeybees in her back garden and is in no doubt that the fruit and veg she grows yield better because the bees are there.  She's also keen for her grandchildren to grow up understanding where food comes from and why we need to understand and nurture precious ecosystems.

    Having said that, not everyone has the time or inclination to have an extra 60,000 "pets" to look after.  If you value bees, but don't want a whole hive of them, here are some ideas that you can put in place cheaply and easily.

     

     

    3 steps to turn your garden into a bee haven

    Bee-killing pesticides and the disappearance of Britain's wildflower meadows has led to a dramatic decrease in bee numbers. This matters because these industrious little insects do more than create honey. They pollinate fruit, grains and other crops and an estimated 50-80% of the world's food supply can be linked directly or indirectly to the humble bee.

    Bees need our help more than ever before, and below are three simple ways you can attract them and other pollinating insects into your garden.

    1. Create a bee hotel

    Solitary bees will need somewhere to lay their eggs. Tying a bundle of bamboo canes together is an easy way of creating a bee-friendly environment. Position your bee house in a sunny spot, preferably out of the rain and within close proximity to pollen-rich flowers. The hollow bamboo canes are the perfect spot for bees to lay their eggs, and you will know you have a bee in residence when you can see mud, leaves or fluff blocking the tubes. When the cane is filled up right to the end you could see 6 to 10 baby bees emerge next spring.

    2. Go wild

    Britain's wildflower meadows were the ideal habitat for bees, with the long grass providing shelter and pollen-rich flowers providing sustenance. Sadly, these meadows are now almost non-existent. Our Meadowmat products can help to recreate an authentic wildflower meadow, with the native grasses and flowers which bees need to thrive.

    You could also consider leaving a corner of your garden untouched. The trend for heavily manicured lawns and regimented gardens is not good for bees, so leaving a small area to go wild could entice bees, butterflies and other insects into your garden.

    3. Be bee-safe

    One of the main reasons for the decline in bee numbers is thought to be  the use of pesticides, with those containing neonicotinoids regarded by some as being especially harmful. The best way of ensuring you are not harming bees is to use natural, rather than chemical, methods of protecting your crops. Manually removing undesired pest species or introducing natural predators can be effective ways of keeping your crops healthy without harming bees.

     

    Choosing bee-friendly plants

     

     

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    • Posted By: Angela Lambert
  4. Friday, 19 December 2014 09:47:58 Europe/London

    Where DO bumblebees spend the winter?  Amy Hilsdon has been finding out.........

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    • Posted By: Amy Hilsdon
  5. Thursday, 13 November 2014 12:22:54 Europe/London

    For most of my time I’ve been extremely uncomfortable around bees.  As a child, if I saw a bee as I was playing out with my mates I’d leg-it as fast and as far away as possible from the offending buzzer. It’s a phobia called ‘Melissophobia’ or the Latin name ‘Apiphobia’.
    In late teens or early twentys, if I was sat outside the local pub enjoying a pint in the summertime and a bee came along, I’d get up & go sit inside.
    In my early thirties it was pretty much the same. I was hypnotised to try and overcome my bee problem. I didn’t work and so I was still nervous around bees for years until…….

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    • Posted By: Paul Watt
  6. Tuesday, 8 October 2013 08:38:43 Europe/London

    Scientists from the University of Southampton have gathered evidence to suggest that bees are being affected by a chemical in diesel fumes that impairs their ability to sniff out sources of pollen and nectar.

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    • Posted By: Angela Lambert
  7. Monday, 19 August 2013 12:45:55 Europe/London

    Gardeners can help increase the yields from their own fruit trees by ensuring that bumblebees and solitary bees have a source of food and safe nesting sites all year round and not just when the apple blossom is out.

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    • Posted By: Angela Lambert
  8. Wednesday, 24 July 2013 12:21:43 Europe/London

    Hedges, ditches and verges play an important part in wildlife conservation programs.  As farmers, we are concious of  how important it is to balance the production of good quality food with the need to support the wild creatures that enrich our lives and help to pollinate crops.

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    • Posted By: Fred Hilsdon
  9. Tuesday, 9 July 2013 10:12:41 Europe/London

    The pollination of plants contributes a massive £200,000,000 to the UK economy every year and bless them, insects such as butterflies, bees, moths and hoverflies do all of that work for free.  But what is pollination and what does it do?

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    • Posted By: Angela Lambert
  10. Friday, 31 May 2013 08:23:10 Europe/London

    A refreshing drink ideal for keeping you cool while you barbecue those steaks.  The two main ingredients come courtesy of the bees.

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    • Posted By: Angela Lambert
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